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Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways To Make Last Stop in Dundee

Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways Arrives In Frankenmuth
Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways Arrives In Cheboygan
Michigan Foodways Set to Kick Off in Calumet
Photos of KIMF and the kickoff of the exhibit at the Chelsea Market Faire
Michigan Foodways on WDET's Detroit Today
Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways Opens To Public At May 26 Chelsea Market Faire
See the Michigan Foodways Video Clip
Michigan Foodways Speakers Bureau Available
DAVID KOSHIZAWA OF ASIAN VILLAGE WINS MICHIGAN FOODWAYS CHEF CHALLENGE
Michigan Foodways On TV! - Debut April 23 in Flint
Apply for a Quick Grant for Foodways Discussion Programs
Enjoy the Taste of Michigan's Food Culture at Michiganfoodways.org
Smithsonian Food Exhibit to Visit Michigan in 2007-8


Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways To Make Last Stop in Dundee

Exhibit on food history concludes in Michigan at Old Mill Museum:  Feb. 1 – Mar. 16, 2008

(LANSING)----The history of American and Michigan food culture will make its last stop on a 10-month, six-site Michigan tour in Dundee beginning February 1.  The Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways exhibit will open to the public on Friday, February 1, at the historic Old Mill Museum (242 Toledo St., Dundee) and will remain on display through March 16, 2008.  An invitation-only reception will be held to preview the exhibit on January 31, and the public grand opening will occur at 6 p.m. on February 1. Before it heads to Dundee, Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways will remain open to the public this weekend (through January 27) at the Frankenmuth Historical Museum in Frankenmuth.

 Key Ingredients is a Smithsonian exhibit depicting our national food culture. Michigan Foodways is a Michigan State University Museum exhibit exploring our state's food story by examining Michigan’s rich agriculture, its diverse ethnic cuisines, and its special culinary traditions.
 
“The Michigan Humanities Council is pleased that Dundee will host a pair of excellent exhibits that explore our cultural and historical connections to food,” said Janice Fedewa, executive director of the MHC.  “The people in Dundee can also be engaged in an wide array of  interactive activities that complement the exhibits and help to explain and learn about the food traditions of the area.”

“We are very pleased to be able to bring KIMF to our area,” said Meg Heinlen, Dundee’s project director. “We are grateful for the cooperation of the Michigan Humanities Council and the Smithsonian.  We also think that people will become more aware of local food sources through our local programming.”

The exhibits are at each site for approximately a six-week period through spring 2008. Dundee is the sixth and final stop on the tour; the tour’s previous five stops were at Chelsea, Calumet, Cheboygan, Whitehall, and Frankenmuth. Each community hosting Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways added its own local flavor to the exhibits’ larger, national and state stories.

A variety of presentations will be held at the Old Mill Banquet Hall, including presentations about cooking with herbs (Feb. 10); the history of Monroe County hunting (Feb. 16); eating locally (Feb. 23); food preservation (Feb. 27); wine and chocolate (Mar. 8); and, demonstrating chocolate candy making (Mar. 8). Also scheduled in Dundee are: a wild game and wine tasting event (February 2; $20 admission at the door), food-themed movies (February 12, 22, 26), ice carving (February 9), a Native American luncheon (February 13, $11 admission); a table-setting contest (March 7-9); and much more. 

Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways can be viewed at the Old Mill Museum during its operating hours: Sundays, noon to 4 p.m.; Mondays, 7:00 a.m. to noon; Tuesdays, 5:00 to 9:00 p.m.; Wednesdays, 7:00 a.m. to noon; Fridays, noon to 8:00 p.m.; and, Saturdays, from noon to 4:00 p.m.  The museum is closed on Thursdays.  Those interested in attending the exhibits or events can contact the Old Mill Museum at (734) 529-8596 for more information.  To learn more about Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways and for a complete event listing, please visit www.michiganfoodways.org.

The Michigan Humanities Council, founded in 1974, is a private, non-profit organization funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways Sponsors

         Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways has been made possible in Michigan by the Michigan Humanities Council. Key Ingredients is part of Museum on Main Street, a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution and the Federation of State Humanities Councils. Support for Museum on Main Street has been provided by the United State Congress, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and The Hearst Foundation. Michigan Foodways is presented by the Michigan Humanities Council and MSU Museum, with support from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, Select Michigan, Schoolcraft College, The Common Grill, Michigan Sugar Company, MSU Agricultural Experiment Station, MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and MSU Extension.
        
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Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways Arrives In Frankenmuth

Frankenmuth Fifth of Six Stops in Michigan through March 2008

(LANSING)-----The history of American and Michigan food culture has arrived in Frankenmuth!  The Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways exhibits opened to the public on Friday, December 7, at the Frankenmuth Historical Museum and will remain on display through January 27, 2008.  On Thursday, December 6, a culinary competition was hosted at Independence Village of Frankenmuth to celebrate the exhibits’ opening and to premier it to volunteers, sponsors, and program providers.

 Key Ingredients is a Smithsonian exhibit depicting our national food culture. Michigan Foodways is a Michigan State University Museum exhibit exploring our state's food story by examining Michigan’s rich agriculture, its diverse ethnic cuisines, and its special culinary traditions.

“The Michigan Humanities Council is pleased to bring to Frankenmuth a pair of excellent exhibits which examine and explore our cultural and historical connections to food,” said Janice Fedewa, executive director of the MHC.  “We are pleased with the programs developed by the Frankenmuth Historical Museum that complement the exhibits and explain the rich German food traditions of the area.”

“Frankenmuth has always been synonymous with food, whether you’re talking about our deep-rooted agricultural heritage, our traditional German cooking, or our famous Frankenmuth Style Chicken Dinners,” said Jonathan T. Webb, Director, Frankenmuth Historical Association. “These exhibits are a perfect fit for our community as it gives us an opportunity to compare our unique food heritage with that of other communities throughout the state, region, and country.”

The exhibits are at each site for approximately a six-week period through spring 2008. Each community hosting Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways adds its own local flavor to the exhibits’ larger, national and state stories. Frankenmuth is the fifth stop on the tour; the tour’s previous four stops were at Chelsea, Calumet, Cheboygan, and Whitehall.  The remaining schedule is:

•   FRANKENMUTH: Frankenmuth Historical Museum. Dec. 7, 2007 - Jan. 27, 2008
•   DUNDEE: Old Mill Dundee. Feb. 1 - Mar. 16, 2008

Additional events scheduled in Frankenmuth include Schmeckt Gut!: A Tribute to Frankenmuth’s Culinary Heritage, a local exhibit in tribute to its own culinary and agricultural heritage. Additional mini-exhibits include: an apron display prepared by 4-H; a history of cookies sales from the Girl Scouts; 1950s artifacts from the Bavarian Inn Restaurant; flour and bean display from Star of the West Milling Co.; and milk advertising signs of the World War II era from the Michigan Milk Producers. 

Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways can be viewed at the Frankenmuth Historical Museum during its operating hours: Mondays through Thursdays, 10:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.; Fridays, 10:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.; Saturdays, 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m; and, Sundays, 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.  The museum is closed on Dec. 25 (Christmas) and Jan. 1 (New Year’s Day); please contact the museum for special holiday hours.  Exhibit entry is included in the regular museum admission price: $2 for adults, $1 for students and $5 for a family pass.

Those interested in attending the exhibit or events can contact the Frankenmuth Historical Museum at (989) 652-9701 for more information.  To learn more about Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways and for a complete event listing, please visit www.michiganfoodways.org.

The Michigan Humanities Council, founded in 1974, is a private, non-profit organization funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways Sponsors

Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways has been made possible in Michigan by the Michigan Humanities Council. Key Ingredients is part of Museum on Main Street, a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution and the Federation of State Humanities Councils. Support for Museum on Main Street has been provided by the United State Congress, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and The Hearst Foundation. Michigan Foodways is presented by the Michigan Humanities Council and MSU Museum, with support from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, Select Michigan, Schoolcraft College, The Common Grill, Michigan Sugar Company, MSU Agricultural Experiment Station, MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and MSU Extension.

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Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways Arrives In Cheboygan

Cheboygan Third of Six Stops on Statewide Tour through March 2008

(LANSING, AUGUST 30, 2007)-----The history of American and Michigan food culture has arrived in Cheboygan! The Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways exhibits are scheduled to open to the public this Saturday, September 1, at the Cheboygan Area Public Library and will remain on display through October 14. On Friday, August 31, a reception (by invitation only) will be held to premier the exhibit to volunteers, sponsors and program providers. Jan Fedewa, executive director of the Michigan Humanities Council (MHC), will make comments at this event.

Key Ingredients is a Smithsonian exhibit depicting our national food culture. Michigan Foodways is a Michigan State University Museum exhibit exploring our state's food story by examining Michigan’s rich agriculture, its diverse ethnic cuisines, and its special culinary traditions.

“The Michigan Humanities Council is pleased to bring to the people of Cheboygan and northern Michigan a pair of excellent exhibits which examine and explore our cultural and historical connections to food,” said Janice Fedewa, executive director of the MHC. “We anticipate the many public programs planned during its tour will showcase Cheboygan’s rich food traditions.”

“It's been a great two years to get to this point and we are excited about our local displays and the programs we've put together,” said Lisa Craig Brisson of the Cheboygan Area Public Library. “The perfect food that represents our community is the food we share!”

The exhibits are at each site for approximately a six-week period through 2007 and spring 2008. Each community hosting Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways adds its own local flavor to the exhibits’ larger, national and state stories. Cheboygan is the third stop on the tour; the tour’s previous two stops were at Chelsea and Calumet. The remaining schedule is:

• CHEBOYGAN: Cheboygan Area Public Library. Aug. 31 - Oct. 14, 2007

• WHITEHALL: White Lake Community Library. Oct. 19 - Dec. 2, 2007

• FRANKENMUTH: Frankenmuth Historical Museum. Dec. 7, 2007 - Jan. 27, 2008

• DUNDEE: Old Mill Dundee. Feb. 1 - Mar. 16, 2008

Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways can be viewed at the Cheboygan Area Public Library during its operating hours: Mondays through Thursdays, 10:00 a.m. – 8:00p.m., Fridays, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., and Saturdays, 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Additional events scheduled in Cheboygan are weekly Saturday Food Fun family events, Monday night food lecture series, and many other events (such as a local food tour on October 13, several cooking workshops, and show and tell opportunities). A complete listing of events is available at http://www.michiganfoodways.org, and those interested in attending can contact the Cheboygan Area Public Library at 231-627-2381 for more information.

Key Ingredients is a touring exhibition of Museum on Main Street (MOMS), a partnership with the Smithsonian Institute and the Federation of State Humanities Councils. With photographs, illustrations, and artifacts, it explores the connections between Americans and food by examining the historical, regional, and social traditions of everyday meals and celebrations.

Michigan Foodways is created by the Michigan State University Museum and presented by the MHC. It showcases Michigan’s food story, its rich agriculture industry, its diverse ethnic cuisines, and its special culinary traditions. The exhibition also acknowledges a number of Michigan food producers and retailers who have enriched the foodways of Michiganians as well as those nationwide.

To learn more about Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways, visit http://www.michiganfoodways.org.

The Michigan Humanities Council, founded in 1974, is the state’s independent, non-profit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways Sponsors

Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways has been made possible in Michigan by the Michigan Humanities Council. Key Ingredients is part of Museum on Main Street, a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution and the Federation of State Humanities Councils. Support for Museum on Main Street has been provided by the United State Congress, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and The Hearst Foundation. Michigan Foodways is presented by the Michigan Humanities Council and MSU Museum, with support from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, Select Michigan, Schoolcraft College, The Common Grill, Michigan Sugar Company, MSU Agricultural Experiment Station, MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and MSU Extension.

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Michigan Foodways Set to Kick Off in Calumet

Key Ingredients starts Friday in Calumet
By JANE NORDBERG, Daily Mining Gazette Writer
CALUMET — After two years in the planning stages, the Key Ingredients/Michigan Foodways exhibits are finally are on their way up north.

The exhibits are scheduled to be installed Thursday at the Keweenaw Heritage Center at St. Anne’s, with a formal public opening event scheduled for 6 p.m. Friday.

“We’ve all been very excited about this since the beginning,” said committee chair Kim Hoagland. “It’s great to see it finally all coming together.”

The exhibits will be open to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Saturday through August 26.

For indepth article, link here.

Michigan Foodways on WDET's Detroit Today

The May 25, 2007, Michigan Foodways interview on WDET-FM's show Detroit Today is now available as an mp3. The interview by host Matt Watroba featured Jan Fedewa, Susan Odom, and Erik Villegas. Listen here.

Governor Granholm has proclaimed May 26, 2007, as
Michigan Foodways Day
. Click on image to enlarge.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE -- May 17, 2007
CONTACT: Scott Hirko, Public Relations Officer,
shirko [at] mihumanities.org
, 517-372-0029 ext. 25

Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways Opens To Public At May 26 Chelsea Market Faire
Governor Granholm Proclamation, Michigan Recipe Story Contest winner to be announced

(CHELSEA)----The Michigan Humanities Council (MHC) officially kicks off the 2007-2008 tour of Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways on Saturday, May 26, at the Chelsea Market Faire, McKune Memorial Library, Chelsea. Key Ingredients is a Smithsonian exhibit depicting our national food culture. Michigan Foodways is a Michigan State University Museum exhibit exploring our state's food story by examining Michigan’s rich agriculture, its diverse ethnic cuisines, and its special culinary traditions.

“The Michigan Humanities Council is pleased to tour a pair of exhibits that examine and explore our cultural and historical connections to food,” said Janice Fedewa, executive director of the MHC. “This collaborative effort demonstrates the tremendous value of working together to provide Michigan citizens with national, state, and local exhibits as well as outstanding programs.”

The day’s festivities begin with an official ribbon cutting ceremony at 10 a.m. with the MHC, McKune Library staff, volunteers, and state and local elected officials. The event includes an Executive Proclamation from Governor Jennifer Granholm declaring May 26, 2007, as “Michigan Foodways Day.” The winner of six entries for the Michigan Recipe Story Contest will also be announced. Since February, the public has cast more than 2,500 votes to select its favorite recipe and story among six entries: Pasties (Calumet), Cranberry Apple Pie (Cheboygan), Sour Cream Coffee Cake with Hickory Nuts (Chelsea), Michigan Mom's Favorite Caramel Apple Pie (Dundee), Pretzels (Frankenmuth), and Asparagus and Red Pepper Tart (Whitehall). Contest results are available at www.michiganfoodways.org

Other activities include entertainment (The Music Lady, The Singles, Chef Chris and the Blue Plate Specials), chef’s tent, Taste of Michigan tent, farmer’s market, and more. The public will also have the first opportunity to view the Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways exhibits. The Market Faire concludes at 3 p.m. The exhibits are open to 5 p.m. on May 26 and daily through July 8. The McKune Memorial Library is closed Memorial Day, May 28, and Independence Day, July 4.

The exhibits will debut at each site for approximately a six-week period through 2007 and spring 2008. Each community hosting Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways will add its own local flavor to the exhibits’ larger, national and state stories. The tour schedule is:
• CHELSEA: Chelsea District (McKune Memorial) Library. May 26 - July 8, 2007
• CALUMET: Keweenaw Heritage Center. July 13 - Aug. 26, 2007
• CHEBOYGAN: Cheboygan Area Public Library. Aug. 31 - Oct. 14, 2007
• WHITEHALL: White Lake Community Library. Oct. 19 - Dec. 2, 2007
• FRANKENMUTH: Frankenmuth Historical Museum. Dec. 7, 2007 - Jan. 27, 2008
• DUNDEE: Old Mill Dundee. Feb. 1 - Mar. 16, 2008

Key Ingredients is a touring exhibition of Museum on Main Street (MOMS), a partnership of the Smithsonian Institute and the Federation of State Humanities Councils. With photographs, illustrations, and artifacts, it explores the connections between Americans and food by examining the historical, regional, and social traditions of everyday meals and celebrations.

Michigan Foodways is created by the Michigan State University Museum and presented by the MHC. It showcases Michigan’s food story, its rich agriculture industry, its diverse ethnic cuisines, and its special culinary traditions. The exhibition also acknowledges a number of Michigan food producers and retailers who have enriched the foodways of Michiganians as well as those nationwide.

To learn more about Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways, visit www.michiganfoodways.org.

Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways has been made possible in Michigan by the Michigan Humanities Council. Key Ingredients is part of Museum on Main Street, a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution and the Federation of State Humanities Councils. Support for Museum on Main Street has been provided by the United State Congress, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and The Hearst Foundation. Michigan Foodways is presented by the Michigan Humanities Council and MSU Museum, with support from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, Select Michigan, Schoolcraft College, The Common Grill, Michigan Sugar Company, MSU Agricultural Experiment Station, MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and MSU Extension.

The Michigan Humanities Council, founded in 1974, is the state’s independent, non-profit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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See the Michigan Foodways Video Clip
A short, three-minute video segment on Michigan Foodways covers the cultural history and impact of the Flint Coney Island hot dog, cudighi, the pasty, muskrat dinners, and Bay Port Fish Sandwiches.

Michigan Foodways Speakers Bureau Available
The Michigan Humanities Council has published a speakers bureau of notable foodways scholars in Michigan. Additionally, the Michigan Humanities Council has quick grants of up to $750 available to Michigan-based, nonprofit organization to help encourage dialogue and the discussion of food, food culture, and foodways in our state beyond the six host sites for Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways. Thanks to Yvonne Lockwood at the MSU Museum for compiling this list.

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Photo: Michigan Foodways Chef Challenge winner David Koshizawa (far left) explains his winning dish to judges (from left) Shawn Loving, Sylvia Rector, and Eric Villegas at the April 21 event held at the VisTaTech Center, Schoolcraft College in Livonia.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE -- April 24, 2007
CONTACT: Scott Hirko, Public Relations Officer,
shirko [at] mihumanities.org
, 517-372-0029 ext. 25 or
Marty Heator, Schoolcraft College, 734-462-4417

For more information on Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways, visit www.michiganfoodways.org

DAVID KOSHIZAWA OF ASIAN VILLAGE WINS MICHIGAN FOODWAYS CHEF CHALLENGE

(LIVONIA)----On Saturday, April 21, David Koshizawa was named the 2007 Michigan Foodways Chef Challenge competition winner held at the VisTaTech Center on the campus of Schoolcraft College in Livonia. Koshizawa is the executive chef at Asian Village in Detroit, and he competed against three other notable chefs to create a Michigan-themed meal using Michigan ingredients such as venison, fiddleheads, and morel mushrooms. Koshizawa’s dish was Quick-cured Venison Loin with Morel Mushrooms, Risotto, Puree of Fiddleheads, Glazed Carrots, and Boursin Stuffed Morel Tempura and White Asparagus Sauce. He was awarded $200 and a certificate signifying his accomplishment.

The event was held to support Schoolcraft College and the Michigan Humanities Council’s (MHC) Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways touring exhibits. The tour will begin at the Chelsea District Library on May 26, 2007, when the MHC will bring the Smithsonian exhibit, Key Ingredients: America By Food and a companion exhibit developed by the Michigan State University Museum, Michigan Foodways. Other stops in Michigan for the exhibits include Calumet, Cheboygan, Whitehall, Frankenmuth, and Dundee. Key Ingredients is a touring exhibition which explores the connections between Americans and food via the historical, regional, and social traditions of everyday meals and celebrations. Michigan Foodways explores our state's food story by examining our rich agriculture, our diverse ethnic cuisines, and our special culinary traditions.

Before a crowd of about 100 food lovers, Koshizawa competed against Jeff Mellas, executive chef, Portofino Restaurant (Wyandotte); Brandon Taylor, sous chef, Asian Village (Detroit); and, Chunyi Hou, second-year student, Schoolcraft College. Each chef was provided Michigan ingredients and one hour to prepare and present their dishes in a context similar to that of the popular Food Network television show, Iron Chef. Judging the event were three notable food experts: Detroit Free Press food writer Sylvia Rector; Eric Villegas of Restaurant Villegas (Okemos) and host of the television show, Fork in the Road; and Shawn Loving, CEC, owner of Loving Spoonful (Farmington Hills) and Schoolcraft College culinary arts faculty member.

A 2004 graduate of Schoolcraft College’s culinary arts program, David Koshizawa has spent four years studying and working with Kevin Gawronski, a master chef from Schoolcraft College, who also is one of the consultants for Asian Village. As the executive chef, Koshizawa will be creating all of the dishes for Asian Village, a new fine dining fusion restaurant at 200 Renaissance Center 26th Floor on the Detroit riverfront. Koshizawa also earned a B.A. in dietetics at Michigan State University. The Montreal, Quebec, native has 15 years of experience in Michigan’s food service industry, including work at Izakaya Sanpel (Canton), Haru (Battle Creek), Garrett’s On Water Street (Boyne City), Akasaka (Livonia), and Zingermann’s Roadhouse (Ann Arbor). Koshizawa’s victory on Saturday adds to a list which includes more than six silver and gold medals in regional and national culinary competitions across the United States.

“We were pleased and excited to work with Schoolcraft College to help create a unique culinary event focusing on Michigan cuisine,” said Janice Fedewa, executive director of the Michigan Humanities Council. “The event demonstrates the popularity of Michigan foodways that we expect will lead to a successful statewide tour of Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways later this year.”

Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways has been made possible in Michigan by the Michigan Humanities Council. Key Ingredients is part of Museum on Main Street, a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution and the Federation of State Humanities Councils. Support for Museum on Main Street has been provided by the United State Congress, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and The Hearst Foundation. Michigan Foodways is presented by the Michigan Humanities Council and MSU Museum, with support from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, Select Michigan, Schoolcraft College, The Common Grill, Michigan Sugar Company, MSU Agricultural Experiment Station, MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and MSU Extension.

ABOUT SCHOOLCRAFT COLLEGE
Schoolcraft College is a public two-year college, offering classes at the Livonia campus on Haggerty Road between Six and Seven Mile roads, at the Radcliff Center in Garden City and online.

ABOUT THE MICHGAN HUMANITIES COUNCIL
The Michigan Humanities Council, founded in 1974, is the state’s independent, non-profit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For additional information on the Michigan Humanities Council, please visit: www.michiganhumanities.org or call 517-372-7770.

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MICHIGAN FOODWAYS ON TELEVISION - DEBUT APRIL 23 ON WFUM-TV FLINT

A short, three-minute video segment on Michigan Foodways will begin airing on Monday, April 23rd on WFUM-TV Flint public television. It will debut twice on April 23: 1) Following Julia’s Kitchen at 1:26pm and 2) Following Unusual Buildings & Other Roadside Stuff at 9:56pm. The segement covers the cultural history and impact of the Flint Coney Island hot dog, cudighi, the pasty, muskrat dinners, and Bay Port Fish Sandwiches. It will soon be made available on the Michigan Humanities Council website, and this website, after it is broadcast for the first time.

APPLY FOR A QUICK GRANT FOR FOODWAYS DISCUSSION PROGRAMS

The Michigan Humanities Council has quick grants of up to $750 available to Michigan-based, nonprofit organization to help encourage dialogue and the discussion of food, food culture, and foodways in our state beyond the six host sites for Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways.

Eligible expenses include:

Guest Speakers: Honoraria and/or travel expenses for humanities professionals participating in film/video/exhibit events, conferences, lectures; may also cover expenses such as printing, promotion, video/audio taping, exhibit rental, etc., related to the humanities scholar participating in or leading the program.

Reading Discussion Programs: Honoraria and/or travel expenses for humanities professionals leading book discussion groups at libraries or community centers; may also cover expenses such as printing, promotion, video/audio taping, exhibit rental, etc., related to the humanities scholar participating in or leading the program.

NOTE: Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways host sites are ineligible for quick grants relating to foodways. Programs and presenters already supported through the Council’s Arts and Humanities Touring Program are also not eligible for additional Quick Grant support.

For more information and to apply online, link to www.michiganhumanities.org.

ENJOY THE TASTE OF MICHIGAN'S FOOD CULTURE AT MICHIGANFOODWAYS.ORG

Public invited to participate in recipe/story contest, learn about Michigan’s food culture as part of Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways statewide exhibit tour in 2007-2008

(LANSING. February 12, 2007)-----The Michigan Humanities Council (MHC) today announced it has unveiled a website, michiganfoodways.org, as a cultural resource and interactive foodways guide for all Michiganians. Michiganfoodways.org was designed to help raise the awareness of Michigan’s diverse food culture as part of an effort directed at the 2007-2008 tour of a pair of exhibits, Key Ingredients and Michigan Foodways. The tour will start on May 25, 2007, when the MHC will bring the Smithsonian exhibit, Key Ingredients: America By Food and a companion exhibit, Michigan Foodways, to Chelsea, followed by Calumet, Cheboygan, Whitehall, Frankenmuth, and Dundee. In addition, the Council will assist local communities in developing their own kiosks and other local programs.

“The Michigan Humanities Council is pleased to offer this website to the people of Michigan to help them learn about the history and culture of the food we prepare and eat,” stated Janice Fedewa, executive director of the MHC. “Not only does it have interesting historical perspectives of food in our state and many local food businesses, Michiganfoodways.org also provides interactive features to help engage the public in dialogue about what our food culture means to us.”

Michigan is best described as having local specialties instead of having its own cuisine. Michigan foodways are the foods of many communities, ethnicities, and occupations that constitute the Great Lakes state. For instance, what really is the typical Michigan meal? In Calumet it can consist of a pasty; down the road in Negaunee, one can find a cudighi sandwich. Those in the thumb area would consider the Bay Port Fish Sandwich for a meal. In the summer, the Traverse City region overflows with cherry pie and cherry sausage. People can always find open a Coney Island restaurant in metropolitan Detroit, something unique to our state. Many Catholics in Monroe consider the muskrat as a fish. And, to celebrate the diverse food of the state, many communities hold food festivals: this includes crowning an annual Bean Queen (Fairgrove), Mint Queen (St. Johns), and Peach Queen (Romeo). Information about all of this, and more, is available on the new website, michiganfoodways.org

RECIPE STORY CONTEST
The website includes an online statewide recipe and story contest, at which the public can vote for their favorite of six different recipes and stories. Each of the entries were submitted by Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways host sites. This is more than a simple recipe popularity contest as each recipe has its own story. The recipes and stories include: Pasties (Calumet), Cranberry Apple Pie (Cheboygan), Sour Cream Coffee Cake with Hickory Nuts (Chelsea), Michigan Mom's Favorite Caramel Apple Pie (Dundee), Pretzels (Frankenmuth), and Asparagus and Red Pepper Tart (Whitehall).

MICHIGAN FOODWAYS DINNER AT THE COMMON GRILL: MARCH 19
The public is invited to feast on Chef Craig Common’s interpretation of the ultimate Michigan meal at his renowned restaurant, The Common Grill. Tickets include wine pairings for four courses and entertainment by special guest, the internationally acclaimed blues and boogie pianist, Mr. B., Mark Lincoln Braun. The price is $100 per ticket, with proceeds to benefit the tour of Michigan Foodways. There is limited seating; tickets are available at michiganfoodways.org

MICHIGAN FOODWAYS CHEF CHALLENGE AT SCHOOLCRAFT COLLEGE: APRIL 21
On April 21, Schoolcraft College’s technology-rich VisTaTech Center in Livonia will host a unique, first-class chef competition including a strolling dinner, beverages, and dessert for guests. Schoolcraft’s award-winning culinary arts alumni, along with a student from their top-notch culinary arts program, will compete to craft a thoroughly Michigan meal in the state-of-the-art facility with live video and audio simulcast throughout reception area. Celebrity judges, including Detroit Free Press food write Sylvia Rector and Restaurant Villegas Chef and Fork in the Road host Eric Villegas, will discuss and select their favorite plates, and a celebrity emcee will entertain the crowd. Proceeds will benefit Michigan Humanities Council's development of the Michigan Foodways exhibit and Schoolcraft College. Tickets will soon be available at michiganfoodways.org

KEY INGREDIENTS MICHIGAN FOODWAYS TOUR
Key Ingredients is a touring exhibition of Museum on Main Street (MOMS), a partnership of the Smithsonian Institute and the Federation of State Humanities Councils. With photographs, illustrations, and artifacts, it explores the connections between Americans and food via the historical, regional, and social traditions of everyday meals and celebrations.

Michigan Foodways is created by the Michigan State University Museum and presented by the MHC. It explores our state's food story by examining our rich agriculture, our diverse ethnic cuisines, and our special culinary traditions. Examining other influences that shaped Michigan's foodways, the exhibition acknowledges a number of Michigan food producers and retailers who have enriched the foodways of Michiganians as well as those nationwide.
The six communities hosting Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways will add their own local flavor to the exhibit’s larger, national story.

The tour schedule is:
• CHELSEA: Chelsea District Library. May 25 - July 8, 2007
• CALUMET: Keweenaw Heritage Center. July 13 - Aug. 26, 2007
• CHEBOYGAN: Cheboygan Area Public Library. Aug. 31 - Oct. 14, 2007
• WHITEHALL: White Lake Community Library. Oct. 19 - Dec. 2, 2007
• FRANKENMUTH: Frankenmuth Historical Museum. Dec. 7, 2007 - Jan. 27, 2008
• DUNDEE: Old Mill Dundee, Dundee Museum and Community Center. Feb. 1 - Mar. 16, 2008

Key Ingredients is part of the Museum on Main Street, a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution and the Federation of State Humanities Councils. Support for the Museum on Main Street has been provided by the United States Congress, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and the Hearst Foundation. Michigan Foodways is presented by the Michigan Humanities Council and MSU Museum, with support from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, Select Michigan, Schoolcraft College, The Common Grill, Michigan Sugar Company, MSU Agricultural Experiment Station, MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and MSU Extension.

The Michigan Humanities Council, founded in 1974, is the state’s independent, non-profit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
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SMITHSONIAN FOOD EXHIBIT TO VISIT MICHIGAN IN 2007-8
Tour to stop at Dundee, Chelsea, Frankenmuth, Calumet, Cheboygan, Whitehall

(LANSING, November 9, 2005)-----The Michigan Humanities Council will bring the Smithsonian exhibit, “Key Ingredients: America By Food” to six communities in Michigan in 2007: Calumet, Cheboygan, Chelsea, Dundee, Frankenmuth, and Whitehall. In addition, the Council will sponsor a state version of Key Ingredients called “Michigan Foodways” and will assist local communities in developing their own kiosks. Michigan Foodways is being produced by the Michigan State University Museum and funded in part by the Michigan Humanities Council and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.

“The Michigan Humanities Council is excited to be able to work with the Smithsonian to bring Michigan an exhibit about the impact food has on our culture and heritage,” stated Jan Fedewa, Executive Director of the Michigan Humanities Council. “We are also looking forward to working with the six selected communities to help them develop interactive programs to complement the exhibits.”

Key Ingredients is the newest exhibition of Museum on Main Street (MOMS), a partnership of the Smithsonian Institute and the Federation of State Humanities Councils. With photographs, illustrations, and artifacts, it explores the connections between Americans and food via the historical, regional, and social traditions of everyday meals and celebrations. In addition to farming, table manners, history, and markets, the exhibition also examines the evolution of the kitchen, the technological innovations that bring us a wide variety of prepared and fresh foods, and the role of public eateries and food celebrations in building a sense of community. The six communities hosting Key Ingredients and Michigan Foodways will add their own local flavor to the exhibit’s larger, national story.

The Michigan Humanities Council welcomes corporate partnerships as Key Ingredients and Michigan Foodways tour Michigan. Those interested are encouraged to contact Greg Parker, Program and Development Officer for the Michigan Humanities Council, at 517-372-7770 or gparker@mihumanities.org.

An opening kick-off event to launch the exhibit is planned for Thursday, May 24, 2007. The Council will announce the location and details for the event at a later date.

Below are the dates and locations for Key Ingredients and Michigan Foodways, and quotes from local officials regarding their selection as an official host site:

CHELSEA: Chelsea District Library. May 25 - July 8, 2007
“ Hosting a Smithsonian traveling exhibit is a great opportunity for both Chelsea and our new library,” stated Metta Lansdale, Director of the Chelsea District Library. “Chelsea has a great agricultural heritage and we hold one of the longest running and largest community fairs. We plan to make this a big part of our programming. We also plan to celebrate our community’s connection to Chelsea Milling (of Jiffy Mix fame) and The Common Grill, which has quickly become one of Southeastern Michigan’s most highly rated restaurants. I am thrilled that the library is able to bring this exhibit and the national recognition that will accompany it to Chelsea.”

CALUMET: Keweenaw Heritage Center. July 13 - Aug. 26, 2007
“I think this is a great opportunity to bring a prominent exhibit to Calumet,” stated Kim Hoagland of the Keweenaw Heritage Center. “The Copper Country already has a strong interest in traditional foods, such as the pasty, and we hope that this exhibit will generate a lot of excitement about our heritage.”

CHEBOYGAN: Cheboygan Area Public Library. Aug. 31 - Oct. 14, 2007
“We have a major expansion at the Library that will be a great location for the exhibit,” stated Lisa Craig Brisson, Key Ingredients Project Manager for the Cheboygan Area Public Library. “We plan to feature how our local Native American and Polish farming communities, as well as our small family farms, have impacted how we live. Our programs will also focus on how whitefish and maple harvesting are important to our community identity. We are excited to bring this important, high quality exhibit to our community ”

WHITEHALL: White Lake Community Library. Oct. 19 - Dec. 2, 2007
“Being a Key Ingredients site will bring our community a greater appreciation for the wide array of food sources produced in our immediate area," stated Bette Carlson, Director of the White Lake Community Library. “We will be planning an interesting array of activities for all ages from recording oral histories from food producing families, collecting old family recipes, cooking demonstrations and workshop to teaching kids about vegetable gardening and much more.”

FRANKENMUTH: Frankenmuth Historical Museum.
Dec. 7, 2007 - Jan. 27, 2008

“Frankenmuth is very excited and proud to be the recipient of the Key Ingredients and the Michigan Foodways exhibits,” stated Sally Van Ness, Director of the Frankenmuth Historical Association. “Frankenmuth is the perfect town for this exhibit. When the settlers came to Frankenmuth from Germany, there was little they could bring with them; however they brought their customs, their language and their wonderful cooking. This town was built on these three things—the wonderful German cooking still remains high priority whether you’re dining out or in the home. The two main restaurants, which continue to remain in the same family, continue to serve the family style ‘all you can eat’ chicken dinners. They continue to strive for innovative methods to produce and are proud to maintain the traditional homemade tastes. This entire community will share in this event as we are all proud to be able to show off our cooking tradition talents.”

“We are extremely happy to host the Key Ingredients and Michigan Foodways exhibits in Frankenmuth,” stated Jamie Furbush, Event and Publication Coordinator, Frankenmuth Chamber of Commerce and Convention and Visitors Bureau. “Our rich history is, in many ways, sculpted by food and this exhibit is a natural fit in Frankenmuth. The exhibits and all the surrounding events will add a great cultural element to our visitors’ experience.”

DUNDEE: Dundee Museum and Community Center.
Feb. 1 - Mar. 16, 2008

“ We’re thrilled to be selected as a site for Key Ingredients,” stated Meg Heinlen, Secretary for the Historical Preservation Society of Dundee. “It’s a dream come true to partner with the Michigan Humanities Council and our national museum, the Smithsonian, to be able to bring an exhibit on our national ‘pastime’ – eating – to the region. We’re eager to share Dundee’s food history, especially our Native American and German pioneer food traditions.”

For additional information on the Michigan Humanities Council and its grant programs, please visit: www.michiganhumanities.org or call 517-372-7770.

 

 

Key Ingredients Michigan Foodways
presented by the Michigan Humanities Council - copyright 2007-2008
119 Pere Marquette, Suite 3B, Lansing, MI 48912. phone: 517-372-7770. fax: 517-372-0027.

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